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Thursday, May 15

  1. page Chemistry 10 edited Welcome to Science 10: chemistry 10This is the textbook BC Science 10 link for unit 2 The text be…
    Welcome to Science 10: chemistry 10This is the textbook BC Science 10 link for unit 2
    The text below includes handouts used in the course and additional resources that I consider useful. Please e-mail any links you have found useful. Thanks.
    {JrSciLabReport.doc} {Independent investigation Experiment.docx}
    {medform_sam.doc} {JrSciLabReport.doc}
    {elemsciproc.doc} {Laboratory Assessment.doc}
    {labsaflist_apa.doc} {GlenSciSafety040130.doc}
    Chemical Reactions and Radioactivity
    Vocabulary
    acids, alpha particle, atomic number, atoms, bases, beta particle, Bohr diagrams, bromothymolblue,
    catalyst, combustion, compounds, concentration, conservation of mass, covalent bonding, decomposition,
    electron ,fission, fusion, gamma radiation, half-life, indigocarmine, inorganic ,ionic bonding, ions ,isotope,
    Lewis diagrams, light, litmus paper, mass number, methylorange, molecules, neutralization (acid􀈬base),
    neutron, organic, phenolphthalein , polyatomic, proton, radioactive decay, salts, single and double
    replacement, surface area, symbolic equations,synthesis, valence electron
    Knowledge
    acids,bases,and salts
    common ionic and covalent compounds
    organic and inorganic compounds
    chemical reactions (synthesis, decomposition, single and double replacement ,neutralization, combustion)
    conservation of mass
    radioactivity
    Skills and Attitudes
    draw and interpret Bohr models
    draw and interpret Lewis diagrams for compounds containing single bonds
    name and write chemical formulae for common ionic and covalent compounds, using appropriate terminology
    use standardized tests for acids and bases
    write and balance chemical equations
    write and balance nuclear equations
    use molecular models
    use the periodic table and ion charts
    demonstrate respect for precision
    
    Chapter four: Atomic Theory explains the formation of compounds
    4.1 Atomic Theory and Bonding
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C1 differentiate between atoms, ions,and molecules using knowledge of their structure
    and components
    - demonstrate knowledge of the three subatomic particles, their properties,and their location within the atom(e.g., by creating
    models)
    - define and give examples of ionic bonding (e.g.,metal and non- metal) and covalent bonding(e.g.,two non-metals,diatomic
    elements)
    - with reference to elements 1 o 20 on the periodic table, draw and interpret Bohr models, including protons, neutrons,
    and electrons, of
    - atoms(neutral)
    - ions(charged)
    - molecules covalent bonding(e.g.,O2,CH4)
    - ionic compounds(e.g.,CaCl2)
    - identify valence electrons using the periodic table (excluding lanthanides and actinides)
    - distinguish between paired and unpaired electrons for a single
    atom
    - draw and interpret Lewis diagrams showing single bonds for simple ionic compounds and covalent molecules
    (e.g.,NaCl, MgO,BaBr2,H2O,CH4,NH3)
    - distinguish between lone pair sand bonding pairs of electrons in molecules
    To understand Atomic History: The Atom in History and Rutherford scattering (discovery of the nucleus) Introduction to ChemistryThe Atom
    To make sense of the periodic table:
    1. general information on the The Periodic table and utube videos about each element
    2. interactive periodic table. Choose your own element!More than one type of periodic table!
    To identify subatomic particles: Subatomic particles and chemical charge in preparation for chemical formulae. Build an atom.
    To identify absorption spectra for elements: click on elements in this periodic tableand Video lesson on periodic table
    To get a head start on quantum mechanics (chemistry 11), check out this applet.
    To understand molecules in motion (gas laws and kinetic molecular theory and more). Diffusion and osmosisacross a memberane (cell)
    4.2 Names and Formulas
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C2 classify substances as acids, bases, or salts, based on their characteristics, name, and formula
    - identify acids and bases using indicators (e.g., methylorange, bromthymolblue, litmus, phenolphthalein, indigocarmine)
    - explain the significance of the pH scale, with reference to
    common substances
    - differentiate between acids, bases,and salts with respect to chemical formulae and properties
    - recognize the names and formulae of common acids (e.g.,hydrochloric,sulphuric,nitric,acetic)
    - use the periodic table to explain the classification of elements as metals and nonmetals
    - identify the relative reactivity of elements in the alkali metal,alkaline earth metal,halogen, and noble gas groups
    - distinguish between metaloxide solutions (basic) and Non-metal oxide solutions(acidic)
    - use the periodic table and a list of ions (including polyatomic ions) to name and write chemical formulae for common ionic compounds, using appropriate terminology (e.g.,Roman numerals)
    - convert names to formulae and formulae to names for covalent compounds, using prefixes up to “deca”
    Check out Ionic Compounds and Covalent compounds and Lewis Dot Stuctures for instructions. Lesson on Lewis Dot Structuresand lesson on combining capacities. The following documents provide practice in writing and naming covalent and ionic formulae. Use your textbook for instructions. Lesson on ions and isotopes.
    Lesson on ionic formulae.
    Lesson on naming ionic formulae.
    Lesson on covalent bonds.
    Lesson on metallic bonds.
    Lesson on transition metals.
    
    {NamForm(Williams)1-981Key.pdf} {NamForm(Williams)1-981.pdf}
    This document is our lab for this unit.
    {Lab_Comparing Covalent Ionic Compounds.docx}
    4.3 Chemical Reactions
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C4 analyse chemical reactions, including reference to conservation of mass and rate of reaction
    - define and explain the law of conservation of mass
    - represent chemical reactions and the conservation of atoms using molecular models
    - write and balance (using the lowest whole number coefficients) chemical equations from formulae, word equations,
    or descriptions o fexperiments
    - identify,giveevidencefor,predictproductsof,andclassifythefollowingtypesofchemicalreactions:
    - synthesis(combination)
    - decomposition
    - singleanddoublereplacement
    - neutralization(acid-base)
    - combustion
    - explain how factors such a temperature, concentration, presence of a catalyst ,and surface area can affect the rate of chemical reactions
    PhET sites are well known for their excellent simulaitons. Lesson on balancing reactions. Check out this site for chemical balancing. This site is a game that teaches you chemical balancing in a fun way (sorry for all the advertising!) This websiteexplains the process of balancing reaction equations clearly. The following website provides excellent practices and answers keys for1. Writing and balancing equations.2. Determining reaction types and predicting products (section 6.1)3. Chemistry 11 Mole concepts and practices.4. Lesson on reaction types.
    {Balancing equations Practice Sheets.pdf} {Balancing Reactions Review.pdf}
    Chapter five: Compounds are classified in different ways
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C3 distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds
    - define organic compounds and inorganic compounds
    - distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds, based on their chemical structures
    - recognize a compound as organic or inorganic from its name, from its chemical formula, or from a diagram or model
    5.1 Acids and Bases
    Lesson on acids and bases. Check out this site for acid and bases and pH scale information. More information on pH scale (chem 12 parts). Calculations with acid and bases (logarithms), buffers, weak acids and weak bases are chemistry 12 topics and titrations are introduced in chemistry 11. This acid-base lab is done in pairs.
    {testing for acids and bases.pdf}
    5.2 Salts
    Identifying salts using flame test simulations. Everything you ever wanted to know about sodium chloride, one of many thousands of types of salts.
    {acids bases and salts identification sheet.pdf}
    5.3 Organic Compounds
    This applet teaches multiple ways for organic molecular modelling in an interactive way. Excellent introduction to organic bonding and naming. This site is very advanced organic chemistry and uses quantum mechanic principles to explain carbon bonding.
    Chapter six: Chemical reactions occur in predictable ways6.1 Types of Chemical Reactions
    There are two labs for this unit. The first lab is a teacher demonstration and the second lab is done in pairs.
    
    {Replacement reaction lab.pdf} {reaction types lab.pdf}
    {More reaction practices.pdf} {Chemical Reactions Practice Sheets.pdf}
    6. 2 Factors Affecting the Rate of Chemical Reactions
    Complete lab in your textbook.
    Chapter seven: The Atomic Theory Explains Radioactivity
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C5 explain radioactivity using modernatomictheory
    - define isotope in terms of atomic number and mass number, recognizing how these are communicated in standard atomic notation(e.g.,Uranium-238: 238U92 )
    - relate radioactive decay(e.g.,alpha,beta,gamma) to changes in the nucleus
    - relate the following subatomic particles to radioactive decay:
    - proton( 1 p1 )
    - neutron( 1n0 )
    - electron( 0e-1 )
    - alphaparticle( 4α2 )( 4He2 )
    - betaparticle( 0β1 )
    - explain half-life with reference to rates of radioactive decay
    - compare fission and fusion
    - complete and balance nuclear equations to illustrate radio-active decay,fission, and fusion
    7.1 Atomic Theory, Isotopes, and Radioactive Decay
    Alpha decay simulation, beta decay Lesson on nuclear chemistry.
    7.2 Half-life
    7.3 Nuclear ReactionsCheck out nuclear fission. How nuclear science works.Applications: radioactive dating, microwaves, and lesson on nuclear fission and fusion.

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Tuesday, May 13

  1. page Physics 9 edited Welcome to Science 9 Unit 3: physics 9This is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 3 The text be…
    Welcome to Science 9 Unit 3: physics 9This is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 3
    The text below includes handouts used in the course and additional resources that I consider useful.
    Source:
    http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/pdfs/sciences/2006sci_9.pdf
    Vocabulary
    acetate, amperes, coulombs, current, electric force, electrons, energy, joules, kilowatt∙hours, ohms, Ohm’s Law, power, resistance, series and parallel circuits, static charge, Van de Graaff generator, voltage, volts
    Knowledge
    static electrical charges
    relationships between charged objects
    electricity
    movement of charged particles
    electric current
    resistance and voltage
    Ohm’s Law
    series and parallel circuits
    power and energy consumption
    Skills and Attitudes
    measure voltage and current using appropriate equipment
    perform calculations
    draw circuit diagrams
    Chapter 7: Static charge is produced by electron transfer
    C 5 explain the production, transfer, and interaction of static electrical charges in various materials
    explain, with illustrations, how static charges are separated because of transfer between various materials
    describe types of static electrical charge (positive, negative) and no charge (neutral) with reference to atomic theory
    describe how the electric force between two objects depends on types of charge, size of charge, and the distance between the two objects
    Introduction to electricity
    7.1 Static charge
    Static Electricity
    Static electricity lesson
    7.2 Electric Force
    Chapter 8 Ohm's Law describes the relationship of current, voltage, and resistance
    C 6 explain how electric current results from separation of charge and the movement of electrons
    distinguish between
    potential and kinetic energy
    static electricity and electric current
    conventional current and electron flow
    relate the charge on electrons to electron flow in a circuit (i.e., from negative to positive)
    define current in terms of the amount of electric charge that passes a point in a given time interval
    8.1 Electric potential energy and voltage
    Current electricity
    Producing electricity
    8.2 Electric Current
    8.3 Resistance and Ohm's Law
    Voltage, current, resistance
    Resistors
    Ohm's Law lesson
    Ohm's Law
    Chapter 9 Circuits are designed to control the transfer of electrical energy
    C 7 compare series and parallel circuits involving varying resistances, voltages, and currents
    define resistance
    draw circuit diagrams using appropriate symbols that are properly placed
    conduct experiments to
    measure voltage and current, using appropriate equipment and units (e.g., volts, amperes)
    determine resistance, using current and voltage data
    4. perform calculations using Ohm’s Law for a fixed supply voltage,
    5. differentiate qualitatively between series and parallel circuits in terms of
    current (may change from resistor to resistor in parallel; remains the same in series)
    voltage (may change from resistor to resistor in series; remains the same in parallel)
    total resistance (increases with the number of resistors in series; decreases in parallel)
    C 8 relate electrical energy to power consumption
    define electrical energy and power
    calculate the following:
    power—using voltage and current data
    energy consumption—given the power rating of a device and duration of use
    9.1 Series and parallel circuits
    Circuitry
    9.2 The Power of electricity
    Electricity in your home
    Transformers
    Enrichment:
    Electromagnets
    Electromagnetic spectrum

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  2. page Physics 10 edited Physics 10 - Unit 3: Motion This link accesses BCScience 10 unit 3. Use the links below to acces…
    Physics 10 - Unit 3: Motion
    This link accesses BCScience 10 unit 3.
    Use the links below to access websites, video-taped lessons and other useful resources.
    Chapter 8: Average velocity is the rate of change in position
    Vocabulary
    acceleration, displacement, slope, time interval, uniform motion,velocity
    Knowledge
    relationship of displacement and time interval to velocity
    motion of objects
    uniform motion
    acceleration due togravity
    acceleration:positive, negative ,and zero
    Skills and Attitudes
    calculate using vav=∆x/∆t
    calculate using a=∆v/∆t, where∆v=vf- vi
    demonstrate respect for precision
    8.1 The Language of Motion
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:PRESCRIBEDLEARNINGOUTCOMESSUGGESTEDACHIEVEMENTINDICATORS
    C6 explain the relationship of displacement and time interval to velocity for objects in
    uniform motion
    - define displacement (change in position,∆x), time interval (∆t),
    and velocity (vav)
    - analyse graphically the relationship between displacement
    and time interval for an object travelling in uniform motion
    Lesson on Uniform Motion: Time and Position Intervals
    Lesson on How to Plot Position-Time Graphs
    Lesson on Position-Time Graphs: Positive, Negative and Zero Slopes
    Simulations:
    The Moving Man
    8.2 Average Velocity
    Prescribed learning Outcomes:
    - use the formulavav=∆x/∆t to calculate the average velocity
    (vav), displacement (change in position, ∆x), and time interval (∆t) for an object in uniform motion,
    given appropriate data
    - design and conduct one or more experiments to determine the velocity of an object in uniform
    motion (e.g.,using carts, balls, skateboards, bicycles, canoes in still water)
    Lesson on Position-Time Graphs: Calculating Velocity
    Lesson on calculating position, time and velocity
    Enrichment:
    Simulations:
    Projectile Motion
    Chapter 9: Acceleration is the rate of change of velocity
    9.1 Describing Acceleration
    Prescribed learning Outcomes:
    C7 demonstrate the relationship between velocity, time interval, and acceleration
    - define acceleration (positive, negative, and zero)
    - give examples of positive, negative, and zero acceleration, including
    falling objects
    accelerating from rest
    slowing down or stopping
    uniform motion
    Lesson on motion with acceleration: Calculating velocity
    9.2 Calculating Acceleration
    Prescribed learning Outcomes:
    - given initial velocity (vi), final velocity(vf), and the time
    interval ∆t), calculate acceleration using the formula a=∆v/∆t, where ∆v=vf - vi (e.g., for falling objects)
    Lesson on slopes of velocity-time graphs
    Lesson on acceleration: change in velocity
    Lesson on accelerated motion: calculating a, v and t
    Lesson on comparing velocity-time and position-time graphs


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  3. page Earth science 10 edited Welcome to Earth Science 10 This is the textbook BC Science 10 linkto unit 4 Energy and Earth Sc…
    Welcome to Earth Science 10
    This is the textbook BC Science 10 linkto unit 4
    Energy and Earth Science.
    Vocabulary
    atmosphere, conduction, convection, Coriolis effect, El Niño, greenhouse gases, heat, kilopascals, kinetic
    molecular theory, La Niña,ozone layer, permafrost, prevailing winds, thermal energy, tornado
    Knowledge
    heat and thermal energy
    conduction and convection
    energy absorption and radiation in the atmosphere
    differential heating and prevailing winds
    changes in air density
    measurement of air pressure
    human and natural influences on climate
    climate affects natural systems
    Skills and Attitudes
    illustrate energy transfer
    use given criteria for evaluating evidence and sources of information (e.g.,identify supporting or
    refuting information and bias)
    Chapter 10: The kinetic molecular theory explains the transfer of thermal energy
    10.1 Temperature, thermal energy, and heat
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    D1 explain the characteristics and sources of thermal energy
    - define heat and thermalenergy
    - explain and illustrate how thermal energy is transferred through conduction, convection, and radiation,with reference
    to
    kinetic molecular theory
    practical examples (e.g.,home heating, cooking methods, loss of body heat, insulation)
    - describe Earth’s energy sources including
    residual thermal energy from Earth’s formation
    energy from radioactive decay
    solar energy (with reference to absorption and radiation in the atmosphere)
    Lesson on heat transfer
    10.2 Heat transfer in the atmosphere
    D2 explain the effects of thermal energy within the atmosphere
    - define atmospheric pressure and explain how it is measured
    - identify weather conditions that typically accompany areas of low and high pressure in the atmosphere
    - describe how energy transfer influences atmospheric convection, atmospheric pressure, and prevailing winds
    (e.g., differential heating of land and water causes changes in air density and affects prevailing winds)
    Lesson on heat transfer in atmosphere
    Lesson on winds and coriolis effect
    Chapter 11: Climate change occurs through natural processes and human activities
    11.1 Natural causes of climate change
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    D3 evaluate possible causes of climate change and its impact on natural systems
    - describe how natural phenomena can affect climate (e.g., biosphere processes,volcanic eruptions,
    Coriolis effect,El Niño and La Niña)
    Lesson on natural causes of climate change
    11.2 Human activity and climate change
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    - describe how climate can be influenced by human activities (e.g.,greenhousegases,depletionofozonelayer)
    - describe how climate change affects natural systems (e.g., shrinking of the permafrost region,
    melting of ice shelves/caps/glaciers)
    Lesson on human influences on climate change
    Chapter 12: Thermal energy transfer drives plate tectonics
    12.1 Evidnece for continental driftSTUDENTACHIEVEMENT􀁸Grade10
    PlateTectonics
    Vocabulary
    asthenosphere, continental drift theory, converging/ diverging plates, earthquakes, epicentre, fault ,hot
    spot, inner core, lithosphere, mantle, mantle convection, outer core, paleo-glaciation, plate boundary, plate
    tectonic theory,primary waves, ridge push and slab pull,rift valley, secondary waves, spreading ridge,
    subduction zone,surface waves, tectonic plate, transform fault, trench, volcanic belt, volcanic island arc,
    volcanoes
    Knowledge
    plate movement and associated features and processes
    diverging, converging, and transform plate boundaries
    deep-focus to shallow-focus earthquakes
    continental drift theory
    magnetic reversals
    Skills and Attitudes
    illustrate plate movement
    identify tectonic mapping symbols
    use given criteria for evaluating evidence and sources of information (e.g.,identify supporting or
    refuting information and bias)
    CChapter 12:Thermal energy rtrraPRESCRIBEDLEARNINGOUTCOMESSUGGESTEDACHIEVEMENTINDICATORS
    12.1 Evidence for continental drifts
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    D5 demonstrate knowledge of evidence that supports plate tectonic theory
    - describe evidence for continental drift (e.g. fossil evidence, mountain belts, paleo-glaciation)
    - relate the following to plate tectonic theory:
    the world distribution of volcanoes, earthquakes mountain belts, trenches, mid-ocean ridges,and rift valleys
    hot spot and subduction zone eruptions
    magnetic reversals and age of rocks relative to spreading ridges
    Lesson on continental drift evidence
    Lesson on evidence for drift theory
    12.2 Features of plate tectonics
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    D4 analyse the processes and features associated with plate tectonics
    - define plate tectonics, plate boundary, earthquake, trench, volcano, spreading ridge, subduction zone,hot spot
    - relate tectonic plate movement to the composition of the following layers of the Earth,as determined by seismic waves
    (primary,secondary,and surface waves):
    crust
    lithosphere
    asthenosphere
    mantle
    outercore
    innercore
    - describe tectonic plate boundaries, including
    transform boundaries
    divergent boundaries
    convergent boundaries (oceanic-oceanic crust,oceanic-continental crust, and continental-continental crust)
    - identify tectonic mapping symbols
    - explain how plate movement produces the following features:
    epicentres and shallow-focus to deep-focus earthquakes
    volcanism at subduction zones (e.g.,volcanic island arcs,
    volcanic belts)and at spreading ridges
    mountain ranges and mid-oceanridges
    hotspot chains (e.g.,Hawaiian Islands,Yellowstone)
    - identify sources of heat within the Earth that produce mantle convection and hot spot activity(i.e.,heat within the core and
    excess radioactivity within the mantle)
    - explain how mantle convection and ridge push and slab pull are believed to contribute to plate motion
    Lesson on Plate tectonics
    Lesson on Plate motion
    Lesson on different type of plate boundaries
    Lesson on volcanoes and earthquakes as related to tectonic plates
    Lesson on earthquakes
    Lesson on volcanoes


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  4. page Earth Science 9 edited Welcome to Science 9 Unit 4: astronomy 9This is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 4The text be…
    Welcome to Science 9 Unit 4: astronomy 9This is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 4The text below includes handouts used in the course and additional resources that I consider useful.
    Vocabulary
    asteroids, axis tilt, Big Bang, colonization, comets, constellations, Copernicus, galaxies, Kepler, moons, nebulae, planets, probes, Ptolemy, revolution, rotation, satellites, solar and lunar eclipses, spectroscopes, star clusters/types, Sun, telescopes, terraforming
    Knowledge
    • technologies advance understanding of the solar system, stars, and universe
    • components of the universe and solar system
    • significance of Earth’s rotation, revolution, and axis tilt
    • celestial sphere in relation to constellations and their location
    • motion of constellations, planets, moons, sun, asteroids, and comets
    • solar and lunar eclipses
    • implications of space travel
    Skills and Attitudes
    •illustrate astronomical phenomena
    •show respect for Aboriginal perspectives
    •identify ethical considerations associated with space travel
    D1 explain how a variety of technologies have advanced understanding of the universe and solar system
    identify and describe a range of instruments that are used in astronomy (e.g., telescopes, spectroscopes, satellites, probes, robotic devices)
    give examples of how astronomers use astronomical and space exploration technologies to advance understanding of the universe and solar system (e.g., using red shift to support the idea of an expanding universe, using parallax to measure distance)
    D2 describe the major components and characteristics of the universe and solar system
    identify galaxies, star clusters/types, planets, constellations, nebulae according to their distinguishing characteristics
    relate mass to different stages in the life cycle of stars
    describe theories on the nature of the solar system (e.g., Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler)
    describe the formation of the solar system (e.g., condensing nebula) and its components (e.g., planets, moons, comets, asteroids, the Sun) and the formation of the universe (e.g., Big Bang)
    describe the processes that generate and events that distribute the energy of the Sun and other stars (e.g., nuclear fusion, solar flares and prominences, sun spots, solar wind)
    D3 describe traditional perspectives of a range of Aboriginal peoples in BC on the relationship between the Earth and celestial bodies
    identify passages related to the relationship between the Earth and various celestial bodies within specific traditional stories of BC Aboriginal peoples
    respond to BC Aboriginal stories and presentations focusing on the nature of stars, the moon, planets, comets, or eclipses (e.g., by creating illustrations; by identifying similarities among stories or between stories and contemporary scientific understanding)
    D4 explain astronomical phenomena with reference to the Earth/moon system
    describe the formation of the Earth’s moon, with reference to supporting evidence
    describe the significance of Earth’s rotation, revolution, and axis tilt (e.g., seasons, day/night)
    describe the celestial sphere in relation to constellations and their locations
    explain the apparent motion of constellations, planets, the Sun, the moon, asteroids, and comets
    explain and illustrate solar and lunar eclipses
    D5 analyse the implications of space travel
    identify various possibilities and limitations associated with space travel (e.g., with reference to factors such as time, essential human needs, robots, budget choices, militarization of space)
    debate a range of ethical issues related to space travel (e.g., appropriateness of terraforming another planet, exposing humans to risks)
    research current ideas or initiatives for further space exploration (e.g., space elevator, colonization of other planets, search for extraterrestrial life)
    Notes from class lessons:
    Applications of Astronomical Technologies
    Assignment documents:
    {Astronomy Mind Map Rubric Name.docx}
    {lesson plan format.docx}
    {unit 4 astronomy.docx}

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  5. page Chemistry 9 edited Welcome to Science 9 Unit 1: chemistry 9 This is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 1 The t…

    Welcome to Science 9 Unit 1: chemistry 9
    This is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 1
    The text below includes handouts used in the course and additional resources that I consider useful.
    Source:
    http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/pdfs/sciences/2006sci_9.pdf
    Vocabulary
    alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, atom, atomic mass, atomic number, Bohr model, conductivity, covalent compounds, density, electron, element, halogens, ionic compounds, mass, melting/boiling point, molecule, multiple ion
    Knowledge
    • properties and states of matter
    • physical and chemical change
    • subatomic particles, properties, and location
    • Bohr model
    • atomic theory
    • the structure and components of atoms and molecules
    • metals, non‐metals, and metalloids
    • periodic table
    • chemical symbols for elements
    • chemical formulae for simple ionic compounds
    Skills and Attitudes
    • create models of atoms and ions
    • draw Bohr models
    • use the periodic table and common ion chart
    • write chemical formulae and symbols
    • name chemical compounds
    C 1use modern atomic theory to describe the structure and components of atoms and molecules
    describe the development of atomic theory, including reference to Dalton, Rutherford, and Bohr
    distinguish between atoms and molecules
    identify the three subatomic particles, their properties, and their location within the atom
    C2 use the periodic table to compare the characteristics and atomic structure of elements
    explain the organization of the periodic table of elements (e.g., atomic number, atomic mass, properties, families)
    distinguish between metals, non‐metals, and metalloids
    use the periodic table to predict the properties of a family of elements (e.g., alkali, alkaline earth, halogens, and noble gases)
    draw a Bohr model of each atom up to atomic number 20 (including only protons and electrons)
    C3 write and interpret chemical symbols of elements and formulae of ionic compounds
    differentiate between elements and compounds
    write chemical symbols for atoms and ions of elements
    differentiate between atoms and ions in terms of structure, using Bohr models
    write chemical formulae for ionic compounds, including those involving metals with non‐metals, multivalent metals, and polyatomic ions
    name ionic compounds, given the chemical formula
    C4 describe changes in the properties of matter
    identify physical properties of matter, including mass, volume, density, state at room temperature, colour, melting/boiling point, and conductivity
    differentiate between physical and chemical changes, citing observable evidence
    name the changes of state of matter, and describe how the kinetic molecular theory explains those changes

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  6. page Chemistry 10 edited Welcome to Science 10: chemistry 10This is the textbook BC Science 10 link for unit 2 The text be…
    Welcome to Science 10: chemistry 10This is the textbook BC Science 10 link for unit 2
    The text below includes handouts used in the course and additional resources that I consider useful. Please e-mail any links you have found useful. Thanks.
    {JrSciLabReport.doc} {Independent investigation Experiment.docx}
    {medform_sam.doc} {JrSciLabReport.doc}
    {elemsciproc.doc} {Laboratory Assessment.doc}
    {labsaflist_apa.doc} {GlenSciSafety040130.doc}
    Chemical Reactions and Radioactivity
    Vocabulary
    acids, alpha particle, atomic number, atoms, bases, beta particle, Bohr diagrams, bromothymolblue,
    catalyst, combustion, compounds, concentration, conservation of mass, covalent bonding, decomposition,
    electron ,fission, fusion, gamma radiation, half-life, indigocarmine, inorganic ,ionic bonding, ions ,isotope,
    Lewis diagrams, light, litmus paper, mass number, methylorange, molecules, neutralization (acid􀈬base),
    neutron, organic, phenolphthalein , polyatomic, proton, radioactive decay, salts, single and double
    replacement, surface area, symbolic equations,synthesis, valence electron
    Knowledge
    acids,bases,and salts
    common ionic and covalent compounds
    organic and inorganic compounds
    chemical reactions (synthesis, decomposition, single and double replacement ,neutralization, combustion)
    conservation of mass
    radioactivity
    Skills and Attitudes
    draw and interpret Bohr models
    draw and interpret Lewis diagrams for compounds containing single bonds
    name and write chemical formulae for common ionic and covalent compounds, using appropriate terminology
    use standardized tests for acids and bases
    write and balance chemical equations
    write and balance nuclear equations
    use molecular models
    use the periodic table and ion charts
    demonstrate respect for precision
    
    Chapter four: Atomic Theory explains the formation of compounds
    4.1 Atomic Theory and Bonding
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C1 differentiate between atoms, ions,and molecules using knowledge of their structure
    and components
    - demonstrate knowledge of the three subatomic particles, their properties,and their location within the atom(e.g., by creating
    models)
    - define and give examples of ionic bonding (e.g.,metal and non- metal) and covalent bonding(e.g.,two non-metals,diatomic
    elements)
    - with reference to elements 1 o 20 on the periodic table, draw and interpret Bohr models, including protons, neutrons,
    and electrons, of
    - atoms(neutral)
    - ions(charged)
    - molecules covalent bonding(e.g.,O2,CH4)
    - ionic compounds(e.g.,CaCl2)
    - identify valence electrons using the periodic table (excluding lanthanides and actinides)
    - distinguish between paired and unpaired electrons for a single
    atom
    - draw and interpret Lewis diagrams showing single bonds for simple ionic compounds and covalent molecules
    (e.g.,NaCl, MgO,BaBr2,H2O,CH4,NH3)
    - distinguish between lone pair sand bonding pairs of electrons in molecules
    To understand Atomic History: The Atom in History and Rutherford scattering (discovery of the nucleus) Introduction to ChemistryThe Atom
    To make sense of the periodic table:
    1. general information on the The Periodic table and utube videos about each element
    2. interactive periodic table. Choose your own element!More than one type of periodic table!
    To identify subatomic particles: Subatomic particles and chemical charge in preparation for chemical formulae. Build an atom.
    To identify absorption spectra for elements: click on elements in this periodic tableand Video lesson on periodic table
    To get a head start on quantum mechanics (chemistry 11), check out this applet.
    To understand molecules in motion (gas laws and kinetic molecular theory and more). Diffusion and osmosisacross a memberane (cell)
    4.2 Names and Formulas
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C2 classify substances as acids, bases, or salts, based on their characteristics, name, and formula
    - identify acids and bases using indicators (e.g., methylorange, bromthymolblue, litmus, phenolphthalein, indigocarmine)
    - explain the significance of the pH scale, with reference to
    common substances
    - differentiate between acids, bases,and salts with respect to chemical formulae and properties
    - recognize the names and formulae of common acids (e.g.,hydrochloric,sulphuric,nitric,acetic)
    - use the periodic table to explain the classification of elements as metals and nonmetals
    - identify the relative reactivity of elements in the alkali metal,alkaline earth metal,halogen, and noble gas groups
    - distinguish between metaloxide solutions (basic) and Non-metal oxide solutions(acidic)
    - use the periodic table and a list of ions (including polyatomic ions) to name and write chemical formulae for common ionic compounds, using appropriate terminology (e.g.,Roman numerals)
    - convert names to formulae and formulae to names for covalent compounds, using prefixes up to “deca”
    Check out Ionic Compounds and Covalent compounds and Lewis Dot Stuctures for instructions. Lesson on Lewis Dot Structuresand lesson on combining capacities. The following documents provide practice in writing and naming covalent and ionic formulae. Use your textbook for instructions. Lesson on ions and isotopes.
    Lesson on ionic formulae.
    Lesson on naming ionic formulae.
    Lesson on covalent bonds.
    Lesson on metallic bonds.
    Lesson on transition metals.
    
    {NamForm(Williams)1-981Key.pdf} {NamForm(Williams)1-981.pdf}
    This document is our lab for this unit.
    {Lab_Comparing Covalent Ionic Compounds.docx}
    4.3 Chemical Reactions
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C4 analyse chemical reactions, including reference to conservation of mass and rate of reaction
    - define and explain the law of conservation of mass
    - represent chemical reactions and the conservation of atoms using molecular models
    - write and balance (using the lowest whole number coefficients) chemical equations from formulae, word equations,
    or descriptions o fexperiments
    - identify,giveevidencefor,predictproductsof,andclassifythefollowingtypesofchemicalreactions:
    - synthesis(combination)
    - decomposition
    - singleanddoublereplacement
    - neutralization(acid-base)
    - combustion
    - explain how factors such a temperature, concentration, presence of a catalyst ,and surface area can affect the rate of chemical reactions
    PhET sites are well known for their excellent simulaitons. Lesson on balancing reactions. Check out this site for chemical balancing. This site is a game that teaches you chemical balancing in a fun way (sorry for all the advertising!) This websiteexplains the process of balancing reaction equations clearly. The following website provides excellent practices and answers keys for1. Writing and balancing equations.2. Determining reaction types and predicting products (section 6.1)3. Chemistry 11 Mole concepts and practices.4. Lesson on reaction types.
    {Balancing equations Practice Sheets.pdf} {Balancing Reactions Review.pdf}
    Chapter five: Compounds are classified in different ways
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C3 distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds
    - define organic compounds and inorganic compounds
    - distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds, based on their chemical structures
    - recognize a compound as organic or inorganic from its name, from its chemical formula, or from a diagram or model
    5.1 Acids and Bases
    Lesson on acids and bases. Check out this site for acid and bases and pH scale information. More information on pH scale (chem 12 parts). Calculations with acid and bases (logarithms), buffers, weak acids and weak bases are chemistry 12 topics and titrations are introduced in chemistry 11. This acid-base lab is done in pairs.
    {testing for acids and bases.pdf}
    5.2 Salts
    Identifying salts using flame test simulations. Everything you ever wanted to know about sodium chloride, one of many thousands of types of salts.
    {acids bases and salts identification sheet.pdf}
    5.3 Organic Compounds
    This applet teaches multiple ways for organic molecular modelling in an interactive way. Excellent introduction to organic bonding and naming. This site is very advanced organic chemistry and uses quantum mechanic principles to explain carbon bonding.
    Chapter six: Chemical reactions occur in predictable ways6.1 Types of Chemical Reactions
    There are two labs for this unit. The first lab is a teacher demonstration and the second lab is done in pairs.
    
    {Replacement reaction lab.pdf} {reaction types lab.pdf}
    {More reaction practices.pdf} {Chemical Reactions Practice Sheets.pdf}
    6. 2 Factors Affecting the Rate of Chemical Reactions
    Complete lab in your textbook.
    Chapter seven: The Atomic Theory Explains Radioactivity
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    C5 explain radioactivity using modernatomictheory
    - define isotope in terms of atomic number and mass number, recognizing how these are communicated in standard atomic notation(e.g.,Uranium-238: 238U92 )
    - relate radioactive decay(e.g.,alpha,beta,gamma) to changes in the nucleus
    - relate the following subatomic particles to radioactive decay:
    - proton( 1 p1 )
    - neutron( 1n0 )
    - electron( 0e-1 )
    - alphaparticle( 4α2 )( 4He2 )
    - betaparticle( 0β1 )
    - explain half-life with reference to rates of radioactive decay
    - compare fission and fusion
    - complete and balance nuclear equations to illustrate radio-active decay,fission, and fusion
    7.1 Atomic Theory, Isotopes, and Radioactive Decay
    Alpha decay simulation, beta decay Lesson on nuclear chemistry.
    7.2 Half-life
    7.3 Nuclear ReactionsCheck out nuclear fission. How nuclear science works.Applications: radioactive dating, microwaves, and lesson on nuclear fission and fusion.

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  7. page Biology 9 edited Welcome to Science 9 Unit 2: ReproductionThis is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 2The text b…
    Welcome to Science 9 Unit 2: ReproductionThis is the textbook BC Science 9 linkto unit 2The text below includes handouts used in the course and additional resources that I consider useful.
    Source:
    http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/pdfs/sciences/2006sci_9.pdf
    Vocabulary
    binary fission, budding, cancer, cell cycle, chromosomes, DNA, embryonic development, fertilization, fragmentation, gametes, genes, meiosis, mitosis, nucleolus, sexual and asexual reproduction, stem cells, vegetative reproduction, zygote
    Knowledge
    • contents of the nucleus
    • relationship between genes and proteins
    • changes to cell membrane and nucleus during the cell cycle
    • cancer
    • sexual and asexual reproduction
    • type(s) of reproduction
    • adaptability of organisms
    • zygote formation (fertilization)
    • stem cells in embryonic development
    Skills and Attitudes
    • use microscopes
    • apply the relationship between scientific principles and technology
    • respect diverse opinions
    B1 explain the process of cell division
    identify the contents of the nucleus: chromosomes, DNA, genes, and nucleolus
    explain the significance of cell division, with reference to the basic relationship between genes and proteins (i.e., genes code for proteins)
    describe factors that may lead to changes in a cell’s genetic information
    describe, in sequence, the stages and features of the cell cycle, including mitosis and cytokinesis
    describe cancer as abnormal cell division
    distinguish meiosis from mitosis in terms of outcomes (i.e., number of chromosomes and number of daughter cells)
    B 2 relate the processes of cell division and emerging reproductive technologies to embryonic development
    distinguish between male and female gametes
    describe the process by which a single zygote forms (fertilization) and develops
    describe and assess the impact of one or more emerging reproductive technologies (e.g., in vitro, cloning)
    explain the role of stem cells in embryonic development
    B 3 compare sexual and asexual reproduction in terms of advantages and disadvantages
    distinguish between sexual reproduction (e.g., human) and asexual reproduction (e.g., binary fission, budding, vegetative, fragmentation) in representative organisms
    relate sexual and asexual reproduction to adaptability of organisms
    Chapter 4: The nucleus controls the functions of life
    4.1 The function of the nucleus within the cell
    Introduction to the cell
    Cell structure part I
    Cell structure part II
    Plant-animal cells
    Cellular transport
    Cell size
    Cellular reproduction
    Transcription
    Translation
    4.2 Mutation
    Mutations
    Chapter 5: Mitosis is the basis of asexual reproduction
    5.1 The cell cycle and mitosis
    Mitosis
    Rate of cellular reproduction
    5.2 Asexual reproduction
    Chapter 6: Meiosis is the basis of sexual reproduction
    6.1 Meiosis
    Secual and asexual reproduction
    Meiosis
    6.2 Sexual reproduction
    Genetics introduction
    6.3: Assisted reproductive technology
    Genetic Engineering
    Enrichment: Genetics
    Genetic Terminology
    Genetic Probability and Punnett Squares
    Incomplete dominance
    Sex-linked traits

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  8. page Biology 10 edited Welcome to Science 10 Unit 1: Biology 10 Life Science: Sustainability and Ecosytems This is …

    Welcome to Science 10 Unit 1: Biology 10
    Life Science:
    Sustainability and Ecosytems
    This is the textbook BC Science 10 link to unit 1
    The text below includes handouts used in the course and additional resources that I consider useful.
    Vocabulary
    abiotic, aeration, adaptive radiation, bioaccumulation, biodegradation, biome, biotic, climax community,
    carbonate, commensalism, decomposers, denitrification, ecological succession, ecosystem,food-chains,food pyramids, food webs, heavy metals, keystone species, lightning,mutualism, nitrification, naturalselection, nutrients, parasitism, PCBs, pesticides, pH, phosphorus, photosynthesis, potassium, predation,
    proliferation, symbiosis, trophic levels
    Knowledge
    - abiotic and biotic elements in ecosystems
    - cycling of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus
    - ecosystems with similar characteristics in different geographical locations
    - effects of altering an abiotic factor
    - species adaptation
    - food webs and pyramids
    - mechanisms and possible impacts of bioaccumulation
    - traditional ecological knowledge (TEK)
    - impact of natural phenomena, foreign species, disease, pollution, habitat destruction, and exploitation of resources on ecosystems
    Skills and Attitudes
    - use given criteria for evaluating evidence and sources of information (e.g., identify supporting or refuting information and bias)
    - formulatea reasoned position
    - demonstrate ethical behaviour
    - relate cause to effect
    - assess human impact
    - show and design an experiment
    Chapter 1: Biomes and ecosystems are divisions of the biosphere
    1.1 Biomes
    are division of the
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    B1 explain the interaction of abiotic and biotic factors within an ecosystem define abiotic, biotic, biome, and ecosystem
    - identify distinctive plants, animals,and climatic characteristic so Canadian biomes (tundra, boreal forest, temperate deciduous forest, temperate rainforest, grasslands)
    - identify factors that affect the global distribution of the following biomes: tropical rainforest,
    temperate rainforest, temperate deciduous forest, boreal forest, grasslands, desert, tundra, polar ice
    - using examples, explain why ecosystems with similar characteristics can exist in different geographic allocations
    (i.e.,significance of abiotic factors)
    Lesson on biotic and abiotic factors
    Lesson on factors affecting biome distribution
    Lesson on characteristics of eight biomes
    1.2 Ecosystems
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    - identify biotic and abiotic factors in a given scenario or diagram,
    - describe the relationships between abiotic and biotic elements within an ecosystem, including
    - air,water, soil, light, temperature (abiotic)
    - bacteria, plants, animals (biotic)
    - design and analyse experiments on the effects of altering biotic or abiotic factors (e.g. nutrients in soil compare two plant types with the same nutrients, compare one plant type with different nutrients)
    Lesson on organization and relationships in ecosystems
    Chapter 2: Energy flow and nutrient cycles support life in ecosystems
    2.1 Energy flow in ecosystems
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    - explain various relationships with respect to food chains, food webs, and food pyramids, including
    - producer
    - consumer (herbivore, carnivore, omnivore)
    - predation(predator-prey cycle)
    - decomposers
    - symbiosis (mutualism, commensalism, parasitism)
    Lesson on food webs and food chains
    Lesson on food pyramids
    2.2 Nutrient cycles in ecosystems
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    - illustrate the cycling of matter through abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem by tracking carbon
    (with reference to carbondioxide–CO2,carbonate, oxygen O2, photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, volcanic activity,
    carbonate formation,greenhousegasesfromhumanactivity, combustion), nitrogen (with reference to nitrate–NO3 , nitrite–NO2 ,
    ammonium–NH4+, nitrogen gas–N2, nitrogen fixation, bacteria, lightning, nitrification, denitrification, decomposition), phosphorus (with reference to phosphate–PO43,weathering,sedimentation, geological uplift)
    - identify the effects on living things within an ecosystem resulting from changes in abiotic factors, including
    climate change(drought,flooding,changes in ocean current
    patterns, extreme weather)
    water contamination
    soil degradation and deforestation
    Lesson on Carbon Cycle
    Lesson on Nitrogen Cycle
    Lesson on phosphorus cycle
    2.3 Effects of bioaccumulation on ecosystems
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    B2 assess the potential impacts of bioaccumulation
    - define, using examples, the terms bioaccumulation, parts per million (ppm), biodegradation, and trophic levels(with reference to producers and to primary, secondary,and tertiary consumers)
    - identify a variety of contaminants that can bioaccumulate (e.g., pesticides, heavy metals,PCBs)
    - describe the mechanisms and possible impacts of bioaccumulation (e.g., eradication of keystone species, reproductive impacts)
    - compare the impact of bioaccumulation on consumers at different trophic levels (e.g., red tide in oysters and humans; heavy metals in fish and humans; PCBs in fish,birds,whale
    - research and analyse articles on the causes and effects of bioaccumulation (e.g.,mercury contamination in Inuit communities and the Grassy Narrows First Nation community)
    Lesson on pollutants in the ecosystem
    Chapter 3: ecosystems continually change over time
    3.1 How changes occur naturally in ecosystems
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    B3 explain various ways in which natural populations are altered or kept in equilibrium
    - explain how species adapt or fail to adapt to environmental conditions, with reference to the following:
    - natural selection
    - proliferation
    - predator/prey cycle
    - ecological succession
    - climax community
    - extinction
    - adaptive radiation
    - describe the impact of natural phenomena (e.g., drought, fire, temperature change, flooding, tsunamis ,infestations- pinebeetle, volcanic eruptions) on ecosystems
    Lesson on adaptation and succession
    3.2 How humans influence ecosystems
    Prescribed Learning Outcomes:
    -give examples of how foreign species can affect an ecosystem (e.g.,Eurasian milfoil, purple loose strife, scotch broom,American bullfrog,European starling in BC)
    - give examples of how traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) can affect biodiversity (e.g.,spring burning by Cree in northern Alberta)
    - research and report on situations in which disease, pollution, habitat destruction, and exploitation of resources affect ecosystem.
    3
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Monday, April 16

  1. page Earth Science 9 edited ... debate a range of ethical issues related to space travel (e.g., appropriateness of terraformin…
    ...
    debate a range of ethical issues related to space travel (e.g., appropriateness of terraforming another planet, exposing humans to risks)
    research current ideas or initiatives for further space exploration (e.g., space elevator, colonization of other planets, search for extraterrestrial life)
    Notes from class lessons:
    Applications of Astronomical Technologies

    Assignment documents:
    {Astronomy Mind Map Rubric Name.docx}
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    12:53 pm

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